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During the six week residency I created a collection of linked pieces, inspired by the day to day transition from Autumn to Winter in Castlecomer Demesne.
Walking Through Leaves


This piece is made up of three, 4 metre banners, representing The Demesne as it moves from Autumn to Winter.
Using my samples a guide for my palette, I made up batches of abaca fibres, and used it as a base for the pieces.
The central banner was created with the abaca and straw pulp and over poured with plain abaca. The pulp was then embedded with found leaves, to create the effect of swirls of leaves falling in the Autumn winds.
The right hand banner is embedded with the Winter seed heads from cow parsley found along the woodland paths of the Demesne.
As the banners move and gently touch each other, they createa sound reminiscent of ‘walking through leaves’.
Abaca and straw with Maple Leaves

Abaca with Beech Leaves

Abaca and Winter Cow Parsley


Winter Landscape

This piece was also created by pouring abaca onto a screen. I then poured and painted pulps such as recycled denim, straw and flax, using string, barks and seed heads for texture.
It was inspired by the shapes that emerge from a Winter landscape once again the foliage dies back.
It was hung from a fishing wire, and moved in the breeze.
Moving Fragments (1m x 100cm, 50cm x 10cm, 10cm x 4cm)


These pieces were formed by pouring abaca and embedding wood shaving. They were hung from fishing wire and allowed to move freely, slowly twirling and relating to each other.
I tried projecting some of the images taken in the Demesne onto these moving pieces but the result was disappointing. I would need more technical know how to create the desired effect.

Then collection of pieces were hung in the studio in the Castlecomer Estate Yard so I could see how they related to each other. I was pleased with the individual pieces but was not sure how they really related to each other. On reflection I fell like In was trying to force the pieces to relate. Coming from a Theatre background, I think I was putting pressure on myself to ‘produce’ a ‘show’; this pressure was also interfering with my creativity. One important element to come out of this residency was that I discovered that it’s okay to create for myself, I don’t need to have an audience. The aim of the residency was to improve my practice.

 

Monday 19th November

Abaca is a fibre that comes from the stem of the banana leaf. It hydrates well when beaten and produces a string crisp paper.
I experimented with beating times for the pulp, then methods of sheet forming and drying; I then compared the results. The longer the pulp was beaten the finer and more translucent the paper. If the pieces were restrained when drying then sheet was more translucent, and created a crispier sound. If left to dry on the frame the paper responded like the skin of a drum. I then experimented with pouring the pulp and letting the pieces dry freely in hope that the fibres would shrink when drying created effect.

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Art at No. 76

The aim and focus of the Art Residency at No. 76 is to enable the successful applicant to research and develop their practice. Other aims of the residency are to: give insights into how and why artists create their work, build relationships and further promote the Arts, provide an awareness and further appreciation of the Arts, cultivate and develop new audiences. The Kilkenny Arts Office is part of ArtLinks.ie

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